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Absolute memory for musical pitch: Evidence from the production of learned melodies

Levitin, Daniel J (1994) Absolute memory for musical pitch: Evidence from the production of learned melodies. [Journal (Paginated)]

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Abstract

Evidence for the absolute nature of long-term auditory memory is provided by analyzing the production of familiar melodies. Additionally, a two-component theory of absolute pitch is presented, which conceives of this rare ability as consisting of a more common ability, pitch memory, and a separate, less common ability, pitch labeling. Forty-six subjects sang two different popular songs and their productions were compared to the actual pitches used in recordings of those songs. 40% of the subjects sang the correct pitch on at least one trial; 12% of the subjects hit the correct pitch on both trials, and 44% came within two semitones of the correct pitch on both trials. The results show a convergence with previous studies on the stability of auditory imagery and latent absolute pitch ability; further, the results suggest that individuals might possess representations of pitch that are more stable and accurate than previously recognized.

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Subjects:Psychology > Applied Cognitive Psychology
Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
ID Code:643
Deposited By:Levitin, Daniel J
Deposited On:26 Apr 1998
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:54

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