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Cognitive views of consciousness:What are the facts? How can we explain them?

Baars, Bernard and McGovern, Katharine (1996) Cognitive views of consciousness:What are the facts? How can we explain them? [Book Chapter]

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Abstract

At this instant you, the reader, are conscious of some aspects of the act of reading --- the color and texture of THIS PAGE, and perhaps the inner sound of THESE WORDS. But you are probably not aware of the touch of your chair at this instant; nor of a certain background taste in your mouth, nor that monotonous background noise, the soft sound of music, or the complex syntactic processes needed to understand THIS PHRASE; nor are you now aware of your feelings about a friend, the fleeting events of several seconds ago, or the multiple meanings of ambiguous words, as in THIS CASE. Even though you are not currently conscious of them, there is good of evidence that such unconscious events are actively processed in your brain, every moment you are awake. When we try to understand conscious experience we aim to explain the differences between these two conditions: between the events in your nervous system that you can report, act upon, distinguish, and acknowledge as your own, and a great multitude of sophisticated and intelligent processes which are unconscious, and do not allow these operations.

Item Type:Book Chapter
Keywords:consciousness, cognitive psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, attention, awareness
Subjects:Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
ID Code:944
Deposited By:Baars, Bernard J.
Deposited On:28 Aug 2000
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:54

References in Article

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Recommended Readings

Baars, B. J. (1988). A COGNITIVE THEORY OF CONSCIOUSNESS. New York: Cambridge University Press.

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