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Butorphanol for Post-Operative Analgesia - A Comparative Clinical Study with Ketorolac

Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur and Vastrad, Nandish S and Koteshwar, Reshma and Mohan, Prashanth and Kadri, Rajani and Kadam, Dinesh and Adappa, Karunakara and Shenoy, Sunil P (2010) Butorphanol for Post-Operative Analgesia - A Comparative Clinical Study with Ketorolac. [Journal (On-line/Unpaginated)]

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Abstract

Introduction: Butorphanol, an opioid derivative has been shown to have, in addition to its analgesic properties, several other advantageous effects like antistressor, sedative and anti-shivering action. The efficacy and safety profile of ketorolac, yet another widely used post-operative analgesic is well documented. This study aims to compare the two analgesics. Aims and objectives: This study was conducted to compare the analgesic efficacy and other effects of butorphanol and ketorolac, administered intramuscularly, in post-operative patients who have undergone lower abdominal and pelvic surgeries. Materials and methods: 50 patients undergoing lower abdominal and pelvic surgeries under general or spinal anaesthesia were randomly divided into two Groups (25 each). At a particular level of post-operative pain, the patients Groups I and II were administered intramuscular ketorolac 30mg and butorphanol 2mg respectively. The analgesic effect was studied using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the verbal category scale. Patients were monitored for the sedative action, respiratory status and other vital parameters for 300 minutes and for other adverse reactions over the next twelve hours. Observations: Butorphanol provided better analgesia within the first two hours of administration, while ketorolac was more effective at 4-5 hours. Better sedative action without any significant respiratory depressant effect was demonstrated with butorphanol. There were no clinically significant hemodynamic fluctuations or adverse reactions with butorphanol or ketorolac. Conclusions: Butorphanol provides better early analgesia as compared to ketorolac with a desirable and safe sedative effect in post-operative patients who have undergone lower abdominal and pelvic surgeries.

Item Type:Journal (On-line/Unpaginated)
Keywords:Acute post operative pain; Butorphanol; Ketorolac; Analgesia
Subjects:JOURNALS > Online Journal of Health and Allied Sciences
ID Code:7113
Deposited By:Kakkilaya Bevinje, Dr. Srinivas
Deposited On:22 Nov 2010 14:19
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:57

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