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Recognizability of Individual Creative Style Within and Across Domains: Preliminary Studies

Gabora, Dr. Liane (2010) Recognizability of Individual Creative Style Within and Across Domains: Preliminary Studies. [Conference Paper] (In Press)

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Abstract

It is hypothesized that creativity arises from the self-mending capacity of an internal model of the world, or worldview. The uniquely honed worldview of a creative individual results in a distinctive style that is recognizable within and across domains. It is further hypothesized that creativity is domaingeneral in the sense that there exist multiple avenues by which the distinctiveness of one’s worldview can be expressed. These hypotheses were tested using art students and creative writing students. Art students guessed significantly above chance both which painting was done by which of five famous artists, and which artwork was done by which of their peers. Similarly, creative writing students guessed significantly above chance both which passage was written by which of five famous writers, and which passage was written by which of their peers. These findings support the hypothesis that creative style is recognizable. Moreover, creative writing students guessed significantly above chance which of their peers produced particular works of art, supporting the hypothesis that creative style is recognizable not just within but across domains.

Item Type:Conference Paper
Keywords:art; creative writing; creativity; Darwinian theory; expertise; heuristic search; honing; style; voice.
Subjects:Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Psychology > Developmental Psychology
ID Code:6845
Deposited By:Gabora, Dr. Liane
Deposited On:21 May 2010 16:01
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:57

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