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Supporting the Everyday Work of Scientists: Automating Scientific Workflows

Vidger, Mark and Vinson, Norman G. and Singer, Janice A. and Stewart, Darlene and Mews, Keith (2008) Supporting the Everyday Work of Scientists: Automating Scientific Workflows. [Journal (Paginated)]

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Abstract

This paper describes an action research project that we undertook with National Research Council Canada (NRC) scientists. Based on discussions about their difficulties in using software to collect data and manage processes, we identified three requirements for increasing research productivity: ease of use for end- users; managing scientific workflows; and facilitating software interoperability. Based on these requirements, we developed a software framework, Sweet, to assist in the automation of scientific workflows. Throughout the iterative development process, and through a series of structured interviews, we evaluated how the framework was used in practice, and identified increases in productivity and effectiveness and their causes. While the framework provides resources for writing application wrappers, it was easier to code the applications’ functionality directly into the framework using OSS components. Ease of use for the end-user and flexible and fully parameterized workflow representations were key elements of the framework’s success.

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Keywords:Workflow management, User Interfaces, scientific computing
Subjects:Computer Science > Human Computer Interaction
ID Code:6741
Deposited By:Vinson, Norman G.
Deposited On:19 Dec 2009 12:20
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:57

References in Article

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