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EVIDENCE FOR "UNER TAN SYNDROME" AS A HUMAN MODEL FOR REVERSE EVOLUTION

Tan, Prof. Dr. Uner (2006) EVIDENCE FOR "UNER TAN SYNDROME" AS A HUMAN MODEL FOR REVERSE EVOLUTION. [Journal (Paginated)]

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Abstract

“Uner Tan Syndrome” was further studied in a second family. There was no cerebellar atrophy, except a mild vermial atrophy in MRI scans of the affected individuals. This is not, however, the pathogenesis of the “Uner Tan Syndrome”, since in the first and second families there were bipedal men exhibiting very similar MRI scans. The second family may also be considered a live model for reverse evolution in human beings. The present work provided evidence for a reverse evolution: (i) quadrupedality; (ii) primitive mental abilities including language; (iii) curved fingers during wrist-walking of the quadrupedal woman; (iv) arm to leg ratios being close to those of the human-like apes. The quadrupedal individuals were raised in separate places, so that they could not imitate each other, excluding the socio-cultural factors contributing to the habitual quadrupedal gait. The results are consistent with the single gene theory, suggesting a single gene controlling multiple behavioral traits, and the psychomotor theory, and a co-evolution of the human mind, an emergent property of the motor system expressed by human language.

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Keywords:Uner Tan Syndrome, quadrupedal gait, reverse evolution, cerebellum, intelligence, speech, gait
Subjects:Biology > Theoretical Biology
ID Code:5329
Deposited By:Tan, Prof. Dr. Uner
Deposited On:22 Dec 2006
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:56

References in Article

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