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Bibliographic Displays in Web Catalogs: Does Conformity to Design Guidelines Correlate with User Performance?

Cherry, Joan M. and Muter, Paul and Szigeti, Steve J. (2006) Bibliographic Displays in Web Catalogs: Does Conformity to Design Guidelines Correlate with User Performance? [Journal (Paginated)]

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Abstract

The present study investigated whether there is a correlation between user performance and compliance with screen-design guidelines found in the literature. Rather than test individual guidelines and their interactions, the authors took a more holistic approach and tested a compilation of guidelines. Nine bibliographic display formats were scored using a checklist of eighty-six guidelines. Twenty-seven participants completed ninety search tasks using the displays in a simulated Web environment. None of the correlations indicated that user performance was statistically significantly faster with greater conformity to guidelines. In some cases, user performance was actually significantly slower with greater conformity to guidelines. In a supplementary study, a different set of forty-three guidelines and the user performance data from the main study were used. Again, none of the correlations indicated that user performance was statistically significantly faster with greater conformity to guidelines.

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Keywords:guidelines interface design displays
Subjects:Psychology > Applied Cognitive Psychology
Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Computer Science > Human Computer Interaction
ID Code:5244
Deposited By:Muter, Prof. Paul
Deposited On:28 Oct 2006
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:56

References in Article

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