Cogprints

The Pragmatics Of Cartoons: The Interaction Of Bystander Humorosity Vs. Agent-Patient Humorosity

Gezgin, Dr. Ulas Basar (2004) The Pragmatics Of Cartoons: The Interaction Of Bystander Humorosity Vs. Agent-Patient Humorosity. [Conference Paper] (Unpublished)

Full text available as:

[img]HTML

Abstract

The pragmatic analysis of cartoons poses numerous difficulties for theoretical pragmatics as well as applied areas. There have been theoretical, pragmatic and experimental studies to uncover the quality of humors, but there is neither a theory specifically designed to account for the source and degree of humorosity in cartoons nor a general theory applicable to the domain of cartoons. Yet three models are prevalent in humor research: the first model (the script-based semantic theory of humor; SSTH) addresses what makes a text humorous and a cognitivistic account mobilizing the notion of scripts and script opposition. The second model (Setup, Incongruity, Resolution; SIR) which dovetails with the former and the third one concerns the stages involved in humor comprehension: three stages are proposed. Finally the third model (the general theory of verbal humor; GTVH) addresses the issue of what makes a text humorous again in a seemingly comprehensive way though it fails to account the nature of cartoons since it is a theory of verbal humors only and since cartoons are not necessarily based on verbal humors to be humorous. In this study, Piyale Madra’s cartoon band ‘Ademler ve Havvalar’ is taken to be cases to investigate. The cartoons that had published at the newspaper ‘Radikal’ since Oct. 1st up until Dec. 17th 2001 are selected for closer scrutiny. Based on the bits and pieces of these cartoons a general overview of a theory of cartoons is presented though such a theory needs cross-validation transcending the idiosyncrasies of a single cartoonist. That is, in order to construct a theory, further studies are necessary in which cartoons by cartoonists of extremely different mentalities are necessary. This is one of the major limitations of this study.

Item Type:Conference Paper
Keywords:cartoons, pragmatics, humor
Subjects:Psychology > Applied Cognitive Psychology
Linguistics > Semantics
Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Linguistics > Pragmatics
Psychology > Social Psychology
ID Code:4904
Deposited By:Gezgin, Dr. Ulas Basar
Deposited On:10 Jun 2006
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:56

References in Article

Select the SEEK icon to attempt to find the referenced article. If it does not appear to be in cogprints you will be forwarded to the paracite service. Poorly formated references will probably not work.

Antonopoulou, E. & Sifianou, M. (2003). Conversational dynamics of humour:

the telephone game in Greek. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 745-769.

Argyle, M. (1988). Bodily communication. Madison, Connecticut: International Universities Press, Inc.

Attardo, S. (2003). Introduction: the pragmatics of humor. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1287-1294.

Berrendonner, A. (1981). Éléments de pragmatique linguistique. Paris: Les Éditions de Minuit.

Chaika, E. (2000). Linguistics, pragmatics and psychotherapy: a guide for therapists. London and Philadelphia: Whurr Publishers.

Dascal, M. (1992). Conversation: structure or process. In J. R. Searle et al. (On) Searle on conversation (pp. 35-56). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Feyereisen, P., & de Lannoy, J.-D. (1991). Gestures and speech: psychological investigations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Holdcroft, D. (1992). Conversation and structure. In J. R. Searle et al. (On) Searle on conversation (pp. 57-76). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Jaszczolt, K. M. (2002). Against ambiguity and underspecification: evidence from presupposition as anaphora. Journal of Pragmatics, 34, 829-849.

Jucker, A. H. (1992). Conversation: structure or process. In J. R. Searle et al. (On) Searle on conversation (pp. 77-90). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Kuperberg, G. R., McGuire, P. K., & David, A. S. (2000). Sensitivity to linguistic anomalies in spoken sentences: a case study approach to understanding thought disorder in schizophrenia. Psychological Medicine, 30, 345-357.

Langdon, R., Coltheart, M., Ward, P. B., Catts, S. V. (2002). Disturbed communication in schizophrenia: the role of poor pragmatics and poor mind-reading. Psychological Medicine, 32, 1273-1284.

Norrick, N. R. (2003). Issues in conversational joking. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1333-1359.

Raskin, V. (1998). The sense of humor and the truth. In W. Ruch (Ed.). The sense of humor: explorations of a personality characteristics (pp. 95-108). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Ritchie, G. (2001). Current directions in computational humour. Artificial Intelligence Review, 16, 119-135.

Roulet, E. (1992). Conversation. In J. R. Searle et al. (On) Searle on conversation (pp. 91-99). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Searle, J. R. (1992). Conversation. In J. R. Searle et al. (On) Searle on conversation (pp. 7-29). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Vaid, J., Hull, R., Heredia, R., Gerkens, D., Martinez, F. (2003). Getting a joke: the time course of meaning activation in verbal humor. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1431-1449.

Metadata

Repository Staff Only: item control page