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The biology of consciousness: Comparative review of Israel Rosenfield, The Strange, Familiar, and Forgotten: An anatomy of Consciousness and Gerald M. Edelman, Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind

Clancey, W J. (1991) The biology of consciousness: Comparative review of Israel Rosenfield, The Strange, Familiar, and Forgotten: An anatomy of Consciousness and Gerald M. Edelman, Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind. [Journal (Paginated)]

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Abstract

For many years, most AI researchers and cognitive scientists have reserved the topic of consciousness for after dinner conversation. Like "intuition," the idea of consciousness appeared to be too vague or general to be a good starting place for understanding cognition. Work on narrowly-defined problems in specialized domains such as medicine and manufacturing focused our concerns on the nature of representation, memory, strategies for problem-solving, and learning. Some writers, notably Ornstein(1972) and Hofstadter (1979), continued to explore the ideas, but implications for cognitive modeling were unclear, suggesting neither experiments, nor new computational mechanisms.

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Keywords:Consciousness, Neuropsychological dysfuntions, neural nets, situation cognition
Subjects:Computer Science > Artificial Intelligence
Computer Science > Neural Nets
Psychology > Developmental Psychology
Neuroscience > Neuropsychology
Philosophy > Epistemology
Philosophy > Philosophy of Mind
ID Code:335
Deposited By:Clancey, Bill
Deposited On:24 Jun 1998
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:53

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