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Driver Distraction by Advertising: Genuine Risk or Urban Myth?

Wallace, Dr Brendan (2003) Driver Distraction by Advertising: Genuine Risk or Urban Myth? [Journal (Paginated)]

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Abstract

Drivers operate in an increasingly complex visual environment,and yet there has been little recent research on the effects this might have on driving ability and accident rates. This paper is based on research carried out for the Scottish Executive’s Central Research Unit on the subject of external-to-vehicle driver distraction. A literature review/meta-analysis was carried out with a view to answering the following questions: is there a serious risk to safe driving caused by features in the external environment, and if there is, what can be done about it? Review of the existing literature suggests that, although the subject is under-researched, there is evidence that in some cases overcomplex visual fields can distract drivers and that it is unlikely that existing guidelines and legislation adequately regulate this. Theoretical explanations for the phenomenon are offered and areas for future research highlighted. likely to be distracting? Contemporary advertisements, forexample, are increasingly eye-catching, provocative and ‘explicit’. Does this have an effect on driving capability, and if so, what can we do about it?

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Keywords:SAFETY AND HAZARDS, ROADS AND SAFETY
Subjects:Psychology > Psychophysics
ID Code:3307
Deposited By:Wallace, Dr Brendan
Deposited On:13 Dec 2003
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:55

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