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Review of Varela, E. Thompson and E. Rosch, (eds. )The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience

Dennett, Daniel (1993) Review of Varela, E. Thompson and E. Rosch, (eds. )The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience. [Journal (Paginated)]

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Abstract

Cognitive science, as an interdisciplinary school of thought, may have recently moved beyond the bandwagon stage onto the throne of orthodoxy, but it does not make a favorable first impression on many people. Familiar reactions on first encounters range from revulsion to condescending dismissal--very few faces in the crowd light up with the sense of "Aha! So that's how the mind works! Of course!" Cognitive science leaves something out, it seems; moreover, what it apparently leaves out is important, even precious. Boiled down to its essence, cognitive science proclaims that in one way or another our minds are computers, and this seems so mechanistic, reductionistic, intellectualistic, dry, philistine, unbiological. It leaves out emotion, or what philosophers call qualia, or value, or mattering, or . . . the soul. It doesn't explain what minds are so much as attempt to explain minds away.

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Subjects:Philosophy > Philosophy of Mind
ID Code:273
Deposited By:Dennett, Daniel
Deposited On:14 Apr 1998
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:53

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