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Predicting health impacts of the World Trade Center Disaster: 1. Cognitive condensation, halogenated hydrocarbons, and traumatic perturbation

Wallace, Rodrick and Wallace, Deborah (2001) Predicting health impacts of the World Trade Center Disaster: 1. Cognitive condensation, halogenated hydrocarbons, and traumatic perturbation. [Preprint]

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Abstract

The recent attack on the World Trade Center, in addition to direct injury and psychological trauma, appears to have exposed an exceedingly large population to dioxins, dibenzofurans, related endocrine disruptors, and a multitude of other physiologically active chemicals arising from the decomposition of the massive quantities of halogenated hydrocarbons and other plastics within the affected buildings. Combining recent theoretical perspectives on immune, CNS, and sociocultural cognition with empirical studies of those affected by past toxic fire incidents suggests the appearance of complex, developing spectra of synergistically linked social, pshchosocial, psychological, and physical symptoms among the 100,000 or so persons directly affected by the attack. The expected pattern greatly transcends a simple 'Post Traumatic Stress Disorder' model, and may come to resemble particularly acute forms of Gulf War Syndrome.

Item Type:Preprint
Keywords:cognition, combustion toxicity, disaster, fire, halogenated hydrocarbon, terrorism, World Trade Center
Subjects:Psychology > Clinical Psychology
ID Code:1817
Deposited By:Wallace, Rodrick
Deposited On:08 Oct 2001
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:54

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