Cogprints

Peirce, Searle, and the Chinese Room Argument

Brown, Steven Ravett (2001) Peirce, Searle, and the Chinese Room Argument. [Preprint]

This is the latest version of this eprint.

Full text available as:

[img]HTML
135Kb

Abstract

Whether human thinking can be formalized and whether machines can think in a human sense are questions that have been addressed since the Renaissance. I will employ arguments from both a modern critic, John Searle, and from one present at the inception of the field, Charles Peirce, and another inductive argument, all of which conclude that digital computers cannot achieve human-like understanding. Searle approaches the problem from the standpoint of traditional analytic philosophy. Peirce would have radically disagreed with Searle’s analysis, but he ultimately arrives at the same conclusion. Given this diversity of arguments against the Artificial Intelligence (AI) project, it would seem its ultimate goal is futile, despite the computer’s amazing achievements. However, I will show that those arguments themselves imply a direction for AI research which seems fruitful and which is in fact being pursued, although it is not in the mainstream of that field.

Item Type:Preprint
Subjects:Psychology > Applied Cognitive Psychology
ID Code:1761
Deposited By:Brown, Dr. Steven Ravett
Deposited On:21 Aug 2001
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:54

Available Versions of this Item

References in Article

Select the SEEK icon to attempt to find the referenced article. If it does not appear to be in cogprints you will be forwarded to the paracite service. Poorly formated references will probably not work.

Ashby, W. R. (1960). Design for a brain: the origin of adaptive behaviour. London: Chapman and Hall Ltd.

Boole, G. (1958). An investigation of the laws of thought (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Dover Publications.

Cariani, P. (1989). On the design of devices with emergent semantic functions. State University of New York, Binghamton, NY.

Cariani, P. (2001). Symbols and dynamics in the brain. BioSystems, 60, 59–83.

Clark, A. (1998). Being there: putting brain, body, and world together again. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

da Silveira, L. F. B. (1999). Some considerations about semiotic machines from the point of view of Charles S. Peirce's Philosophy, [http://www.inm.de/kip/SEMIOTIC/silveira_article.html]. ARISBE: http://www.door.net/arisbeJune].

Dennett, D. C. (1991). Consciousness explained (1st ed.). Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company.

Dreyfus, H. L. (1972). What computers can't do. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Dreyfus, H. L. (1993). What computers still can't do: a critique of artificial reason (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Habermas, J. (1995). Peirce and communication. In K. L. Ketner (Ed.) (1st ed., Vol. 1). New York, NY: Fordham University Press.

Hanson, N. R. (1965). Patterns of discovery; an inquiry into the conceptual foundations of science. Cambridge [Eng.]: Cambridge University Press.

Harnad, S. (1990). The symbol grounding problem. Physica D, 42, 335-346.

Harrison, R. R. a. K., C. (2000). A silicon implementation of the fly's optomotor control system. Neural Computation, 12, 2291-2304.

Houser, N., & Kloesel, C. (1991). The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. 1). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Johnson, M. (1993). Moral imagination: implications of cognitive science for ethics (1st ed.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Ketner, K. L. (1988). Peirce and Turing: comparisons and conjectures. Semiotica, 68(1/2), 33-61.

Lakoff, G. (1990). Women, fire, and dangerous things (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.

Lakoff, G., & Núñez, R. E. (2000). Where mathematics comes from: how the embodied mind brings mathematics into being. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Mead, C. (1988). Analog VLSI and neural systems. New York, NY: Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.

Pattee, H. H. (1997). The physics of symbols and the evolution of semiotic control, Workshop on control mechanisms for complex systems: issues of measurement and semiotic analysis, Las Cruces, New Mexico, Dec. 8-12,1996 (Vol. Proceedings Volume). Redwood City, CA: Addison-Wesley.

Peirce, C. S. (1992a). Deduction, induction, and hypothesis. In N. Houser & C. Kloesel (Eds.), The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. I, pp. 186-199). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Peirce, C. S. (1992b). A guess at the riddle. In N. Houser & C. Kloesel (Eds.), The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. I, pp. 245-279). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Peirce, C. S. (1992c). Questions concerning certain faculties claimed for man. In N. Houser & C. Kloesel (Eds.), The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. I, pp. 11-27). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Peirce, C. S. (1992d). Some consequences of four incapacities. In N. Houser & C. Kloesel (Eds.), The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. I, pp. 28-55). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Peirce, C. S. (1998a). The basis of pragmaticism in the normative sciences. In N. Houser & A. De Tienne & J. R. Eller & C. L. Clark & A. C. Lewis & D. B. Davis (Eds.), The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. II, pp. 360-371). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Peirce, C. S. (1998b). On the logic of drawing history from ancient documents, especially from testimonies. In N. Houser & A. De Tienne & J. R. Eller & C. L. Clark & A. C. Lewis & D. B. Davis (Eds.), The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. II, pp. 75-114). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Peirce, C. S. (1998c). What makes a reasoning sound? In N. Houser & A. De Tienne & J. R. Eller & C. L. Clark & A. C. Lewis & D. B. Davis (Eds.), The essential Peirce: selected philosophical writings (Vol. II, pp. 242-257). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Searle, J. R. (1990). Is the brain's mind a computer program? Scientific American, 262(1), 26-37.

Searle, J. R. (1994). The rediscovery of the mind (5th ed.). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Wiener, P. P. (Ed.). (1951). Leibniz, selections. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.

Metadata

Repository Staff Only: item control page