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How Well Do We Know Our Own Conscious Experience? The Case of Human Echolocation

Schwitzgebel, Eric and Gordon, Michael S (2000) How Well Do We Know Our Own Conscious Experience? The Case of Human Echolocation. [Preprint]

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Abstract

Researchers from the 1940's through the present have found that normal, sighted people can echolocate - that is, detect properties of silent objects by attending to sound reflected from them. We argue that echolocation is a normal part of our conscious, perceptual experience. Despite this, we argue that people are often grossly mistaken about their experience of echolocation. If so, echolocation provides a counterexample to the view that we cannot be seriously mistaken about our own current conscious experience.

Item Type:Preprint
Keywords:echolocation, audition, hearing, consciousness, phenomenology, introspection, self-knowledge
Subjects:Psychology > Perceptual Cognitive Psychology
Philosophy > Epistemology
Philosophy > Philosophy of Mind
ID Code:1491
Deposited By:Schwitzgebel, Eric
Deposited On:09 May 2001
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:54

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