Cogprints

An Evolutionary Hypothesis for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Psychological Immune System?

Abed, Riadh T and de Pauw, Karel W (1999) An Evolutionary Hypothesis for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Psychological Immune System? [Journal (Paginated)]

Full text available as:

[img]HTML
32Kb

Abstract

A new hypothesis is presented within the framework of evolutionary psychology that attempts to explain the origins of obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is suggested that obsessions and compulsions originate from the overactivity of a mental module that the majority of humans possess and has the function of generating risk scenarios without voluntary intervention. It is hypothesised that obsessional phenomena function as an off-line risk avoidance process, designed to lead to risk avoidance behaviour at a future time, thus distinguishing it from anxiety and related phenomena as on-line emotional states, designed to lead to the avoidance of immediate and direct risks. Finally, the hypothesis makes a number of specific predictions that are testable and refutable. It is contended that the present hypothesis if supported by empirical evidence could serve as a basis for future research on this important disorder.

Item Type:Journal (Paginated)
Keywords:Darwinism, evolutionary psychology, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder
Subjects:Psychology > Evolutionary Psychology
ID Code:1147
Deposited By:Abed, Riadh T
Deposited On:19 Dec 2000
Last Modified:11 Mar 2011 08:54

Metadata

Repository Staff Only: item control page